Fowey Holiday Cottages & Luxury Homes

Fowey Cottages

Best Holiday Cottages in Fowey

We have brought together a collection of Fowey's best luxury self-catering cottages and holiday homes. Narrow-streets and plenty of charm sum up fabulous Fowey.

If you are looking for a self-catering holiday let in Cornwall, whether for a romantic retreat or large family holiday, Fowey will have an apartment or holiday cottage that will invite you to return to this Cornish gem time and again.

Why Fowey Holiday Cottages?

Narrow-streets and plenty of charm sum up fabulous Fowey. Its nautical history lends it to picture-postcard views, and streets lined with quaint pubs and restaurants. It is also home to the Polruan Ferry, which takes you just across the estuary for waterside views of Fowey and walks up the headland.

Fowey was the home of writer, Daphne du Maurier, so it has attracted her fans for many years. Her world of wreckers and creeks captured the literary imagination, drawing many to this splendid town on the south coast of Cornwall. The Menabilly Estate features as Manderley in Rebecca. There is now an annual arts and literature event, Fowey Festival, which takes place in May, featuring established and emerging writers.

Check out the Fowey Museum at the waterfront, and perhaps enjoy a cream tea at the splendid Fowey Hotel. Fimbarrus Church sits in Fowey. It features in du Maurier’s My Cousin Rachel, where Philip is worshipping while Rachel is having a secret assignation – yes, it all happens in her novels so you may want to read one while you’re here. In the church, seek out the beautifully-carved font with its decorative honeysuckle leaf pattern.

In days of yore, Fowey, a pilchard exporting town, was prey to pirates; it was also occupied by Parliamentarian troops during the Civil War. It is hard to imagine its turbulent history when you visit today, so make the most of its modern amenities. Perhaps a river trip? Or a visit to the aquarium comprising native and local species such as crabs and lobsters. For something a little different, maybe try the Bird Lady of Fowey with her collection of owls and hawks. Meanwhile, art connoisseurs might enjoy a visit to the unique River Gallery.

For food, you have many options but Appleton’s Bar and Restaurant comes highly recommended by locals for rustic Italian food with a contemporary twist: brunch, lunch and dinner options are all available.

 

 

More From The Ultimate Guide To Fowey

Narrow-streets and a massive injection of charm attract many visitors to fabulous Fowey, where you will be wowed by the picture-postcard views of the estuary, and attracted by the narrow the streets lined with quaint pubs and restaurants. Home to the Polruan Ferry, you can cross the estuary for waterside views of Fowey and walks up on the headland for awesome views. Fowey is maybe best known for its Daphne du Maurier connections. Her world of wreckers and creeks captured the literary imagination, drawing many to this splendid town in south Cornwall. For good reason.

Why stay here? Obviously, if you are a du Maurier fan, then seeing places which were special to the author and which appear in her novels is a must. For example, the Menabilly Estate features as Manderley in Rebecca. There is now an annual arts and literature event, Fowey Festival, which takes place in May, featuring established big names and emerging writers, with more than a touch of du Maurier interest included.

Don’t miss the tiny one-room Fowey Museum at the waterfront, which is packed out with artefacts, including the cape worn by Garibaldi during his Italian campaign. Or impress the kids there showing them the excavated contents of a medieval garderobe (toilet) which tells us a great deal about the diet in those days.

More salubriously, perhaps enjoy a cream tea at the splendidly impressive Fowey Hotel with picturesque views over the harbour. Fimbarrus Church also sits in Fowey, featuring in du Maurier’s My Cousin Rachel, where Philip is worshipping while Rachel is having a secret assignation – yes, it all happens in her novels so you may want to read one while you’re here. In the church, seek out the beautifully-carved font with its decorative honeysuckle leaf pattern.

Back in the day, Fowey, a pilchard exporting town, was prey to pirates; it was also occupied by Parliamentarian troops during the Civil War. Its calm and beautiful exterior belies a dramatic history.

What else to see? Would you enjoy a river trip? Bodinnick across the river gets the best sunshine. Check out the Old Ferry Inn close to du Maurier’s holiday home, Ferryside. Or a visit to the aquarium comprising native and local species such as crabs and lobsters. For something a little different, maybe try the Bird Lady of Fowey with her collection of owls and hawks. Meanwhile, art connoisseurs might enjoy a visit to the unique River Gallery.

For food, you have many options but Appleton’s Bar and Restaurant comes highly recommended by locals for rustic Italian food with a contemporary twist: brunch, lunch and dinner options are all available. It is said to be the best place in Fowey for a negroni. Food options in Small but perfect Fowey are many and varied, from crab and dill sandwiches to saffron coquetas. Check out the Quay Bakery for artisan breads, croissants, focaccia and sourdough. Captain Hank’s Crab and Snack Shack is the home of the crab sandwich, while Sam’s on the Beach provides the best views. If you fancy tapas and sherry, try tucked away Pinxto. Finally, for fine dining try the sophisticated sharing seafood plates at the Fitzroy.

As with all Cornish towns, you are never too far from places of interest. The Eden Project, Charlestown and Polperro are all pretty close to fabulous Fowey if you want to travel farther afield.