National Trust Spots

National Trust Spots

In 1895 Octavia Hill, Canon Hardwicke Rawnsley and Sir Robert Hunter came together to establish the National Trust. Spring forward to 2021 and the National Trust care for 780 miles of coastline, over 248,000 hectares of land, over 500 historic houses, castles, ancient monuments, gardens, parks and nature reserves (including 9 lighthouses, 56 villages, 39 pubs and a gold mine).

In Cornwall we’re lucky enough to have over 50 National Trust sites to visit across the county. Given that over half of the Cornish coast is owned by the National Trust, alongside preservation of Cornwall’s industrial heritage sites such as fishing coves and tin mining sites, you’re never far away from a National Trust site in the South West.

One of Cornwall’s most impressive has to be the place where radio was invented. The Marconi Centre in Poldhu situated on the Lizard Peninsula, received the world’s first transatlantic radio transmission in 1901. Or high-up on the exposed cliffs of the 'Tin Coast' sits the Levant Mine and Beam Engine which is and part of the Cornish Mining World Heritage Site. But National Trust sites aren’t just for history buffs, there are some beautiful gardens and coastal trails for walking enthusiasts too, many with a café and picnic spots to refuel.